18th International Plant Protection Congress (IPPC) in Berlin

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THE 18TH International Plant Protection Congress in Berlin revolves around the central idea, that the systematic use of scientifically sound plant protection measures will result in enough food for the whole humankind. The congress takes place from August 24 to 27, 2015, under the patronage of the International Association for the Plant Protection Sciences (IAPPS), the German Scientific Society for Plant Protection and Plant Health (DPG), the Julius Kuhn-Institut (JKI) and the Agriculture Industry Association (IVA).


Particularly in countries with food shortage, often more than one third of all cultivated plants get lost because of pests, weeds, post-harvest losses, exposure to vulnerable climate change conditions etc.


Integrated plant protection does not only mean taking advantage of all possibilities of plant cultivation, field preparation and the local conditions, but also means to consider biological control procedures and to observe forecasts of damaging events. Further, and only as a last resort, it also implies the use of chemical pesticides to reach a maximum production of healthy plants. Properly performed integrated pest management additionally entails the exclusion of possible negative effects on man and environment.


Dr Falko Feldmann, Managing Director of DPG and IPCC said, “The international meeting will help to address open questions on agricultural, biological and technical matters that will allow us to provide proper solutions on time despite the continuously rising demand on food in the future.”


The conference programme shows that it will focus of this scientific exchange is the handling of abiotic harms, which are continuously revolving and rapidly spreading. Through climate change and global trade diseases, pests and weeds increasingly invade into new regions and may affect unprepared farmers, in the worst case. Climate changes also lead to new cultivation scenarios, not only resulting in new abiotic disorders, but in the need to develop completely new complex cultivation methods out of the old ones. The flow of information from science to the consultants and, finally, to the people on the field or in the greenhouse is considered as particularly important. But also the networking with industry and commerce and the agreement of new processes and standards are determined as main goals.


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Published in: Volume 06 Issue 29

Short Link: http://www.technologytimes.pk/?p=13872