Risks Facing Windows Computers And How You Can Avoid Them

If you notice your brand-new PC is loaded up with brand-specific software, do yourself a favor and delete them. They rarely offer anything useful, they slow down the device, and they can even cause security issues.

Introduction

Windows, macOS, and Linux: these three operating systems dominate the world, but one stands above the rest: Windows. Since the ’90s, Windows has been the people’s OS—always available, always trustworthy, and compatible with almost everything.

In terms of security, however, it’s not perfect. There are a few threats Windows users need to be wary about.

The Dangers Facing Windows Computers

Viruses

Viruses have haunted Windows users since Windows 95. They are a constant in the cybersecurity field, and the only way users can avoid viruses is by practicing proper cybersecurity.

Viruses vary in their effectiveness and spread, but one thing’s for sure: there is no such thing as a good virus.

Unencrypted Wi-Fi

It’s no secret that public Wi-Fi leaves users vulnerable to cybercriminals and malware. But why? Why do public networks lack the security other networks have? Well, it’s that way for a variety of reasons, the number one reason being the lack of a password.

Public networks rarely require passwords to use, meaning anyone can use them to log on and steal data and even view everyone’s online activity. Hackers are always taking advantage of public networks’ lack of security. You could install a VPN for PC, or you can just avoid public networks in general.

3 Ways to Secure Your Windows Device

 

1. Keep External Backups

Imagine losing all of your data in an instant. No way to get it all back—your PC’s data is completely gone. It sounds like a grim situation, doesn’t it? Unfortunately, it’s the reality of many people. Something as random as a hard drive issue can erase years of documents. But so can cyber-attacks.

From ransomware encrypting hard drives to viruses destroying entire computers, it’s a strong possibility that a cyberattack leaves you without your computer. Luckily, external storage drives exist, and it’s recommended that you use them.

Storing all of your data on an external solid-state drive and backing up your data frequently can save you from losing all of your data.

2. Update Windows Whenever Possible

Windows 10 is the result of decades of developers constantly improving the Windows operating system. So it’s no surprise when such a long-term project possesses some security issues.

The truth is, there’s no perfect operating system. All operating systems have their own backdoors, their own bugs, etc. But because Windows is so common amongst the general population, hackers target it specifically.

Microsoft knows how important security is to its users. As a result, Windows developers are always pushing out security fixes with Windows updates. Not downloading these updates means putting your device at risk of a cyber-attack. Do the right thing. Update Windows as often as possible.

3. Delete any Bloatware

While building your own PC has become a popular option for those looking to save some money, many still buy their own pre-built PCs. Plus, you can’t exactly build a laptop like you can a desktop.

On the surface, buying a prebuilt isn’t a problem. However, many OEM companies (Dell, HP, ASUS, etc.) load their Windows devices up with bloatware, software that slows down your PC for little gain. An example of this would be Lenovo’s Superfish ad-injection program, which not only sparked controversy but compromised the security of Lenovo’s laptops.

If you notice your brand-new PC is loaded up with brand-specific software, do yourself a favor and delete them. They rarely offer anything useful, they slow down the device, and they can even cause security issues.

What started as a small, 16-bit project in 1985 (Windows 1) has evolved to become the most popular operating system as of writing this. But despite its popularity, it’s not perfect, and it’s up to the users to iron out any potential issues. Well, until Microsoft gets around to fixing them.

If you’re not taking security seriously, start doing so. Hackers target Windows due to its popularity, so the last thing you want is to be caught in a cyber-attack.

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