Chinese firm plans to develop commercial remote sensing satellite system

The China Siwei Surveying and Mapping Technology will build its new-generation commercial remote sensing satellite system by 2025.

Chinese firm plans to develop commercial remote sensing satellite system

The China Siwei Surveying and Mapping Technology will build its new-generation commercial remote sensing satellite system by 2025.

Zhang Xiaodong, general manager of the company, made the remarks at the ongoing 14th China International Aviation and Aerospace Exhibition, also known as Airshow China, in the southern port city of Zhuhai.

The commercial remote sensing satellite system features 28 satellites with various payloads, covering more than 30 million square kilometers of daily ground data on average, Zhang was quoted as saying in the news report.

Among the 28 satellites, 16 have higher than 0.5-meter resolution, four have 0.7-meter resolution, and eight have higher than 1-meter resolution, according to the report.

The company has completed the building of four satellites for the system and has begun to provide timely, efficient and high-performance spatio-temporal information services.

The advantages of remote sensing include the ability to collect information over large spatial areas; to characterize natural features or physical objects on the ground; to observe surface areas and objects on a systematic basis and monitor their changes over time; and the ability to integrate this data with other information to aid decision-making.

Remote sensing from airplanes or satellites can be collected at various spatial resolutions [spatial resolution refers to the smallest feature that can be resolved in an image]. High resolution remote sensing images can resolve smaller features–often less than a meter in size–whereas moderate or lower resolution images can detect features in a size range of tens to hundreds of meters or larger.

Remote sensing instruments may also acquire data in different spectral bands of the electromagnetic spectrum (e.g., infrared, near-infrared), which provides information, for example, to help classify and categorize vegetation. Data collected in the thermal infrared bands are especially useful for water management. Light detection and ranging (lidar) instruments provide topographic data that can form the basis of digital elevation models.