China’s Dongfang Begins Operations Of Geothermal Power Plant

China’s Dongfang Electric has started operations of an 80-kW ORC geothermal power plant using water from an oil and gas field of PetroChina.

China’s Dongfang Electric has started operations of an 80-kW ORC geothermal power plant using water from an oil and gas field of PetroChina.

China’s state-owned Dongfang Electric Group Co. Ltd. (Dongfang Electric) has started operations of the country’s geothermal power generation plant associated with an oil and gas field. The newly-built geothermal power generation uses ORC technology and has an installed capacity of 80 kW.

The geothermal power generation project had been installed in the Chuanzhong Gas Mine of PetroChina Southwest Oil and Gas Field Branch Company. The mine produces an average 600 cubic meters of gas field water per days from wells with a bottom temperature of 140 degrees Celsius. The power generation unit was supplied specifically by Well X210.

A geothermal power generation project generates electricity by using heat from the earth’s interior. This heat can be obtained by drilling wells into geothermal reservoirs, and the resulting steam or hot water is then used to power a turbine, which generates electricity.

Because the heat from the Earth is constantly replenished, geothermal power is considered a renewable energy source. It is also more stable than other renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind. It is, however, a very expensive power source to build and maintain.

Dongfang Electric Corporation Limited (DEC) is a Chinese multinational corporation that designs, manufactures, and sells power generation equipment, including turbines, generators, boilers, and other power plant equipment.

The company was founded in 1954 and is based in Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China. It is one of the largest power generation equipment manufacturers in China and also has a presence in over 80 countries worldwide.

DEC has a wide range of products and services, including conventional and renewable energy power generation equipment and services, as well as engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) services for power plants.

Originally published at ThinkGeoEnergy

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