Before leaving Pakistan I had written a column “India’s Space Diplomacy in 2017: Where Pakistan Is Standing?” published in TechnologyTimes on July 19th, 2017.

Chandrayaan-2 was really a failure, but for whom?

Author: Eng. Mirza Abdul Aleem Baig

CAS-TWAS President’s Fellow, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC)

In that column I highlighted the fundamental shift in how nations manage their international relations beyond the classic diplomacy and the attitude of Indian government/ISRO for technological capabilities in outer space as an effective tool of foreign policy.

Additionally, I also compared the SUPARCO (subcontinent’s oldest space agency) with ISRO in term of satellite launching and producing technology and how the focus of SUPARCO became countering India, rather than explore and investigation, research and development.

That attempt was not only to draw attention towards the use of space dexterity to expand diplomatic influence to achieve Pakistan Space Vision 2040, but also soft power projection. Surprisingly, I received mixed comments from fellows and readers in the context of “patriotism”.

The core motive to pen-down this column “Chandrayaan-2 is really a failure, but for whom?” is to highlight the quote of Prof. Dr. Abdus Salam

“Scientific thought and its creation is the common and shared heritage of mankind”.

Let’s have a look on Chandrayaan-2 – Chandrayaan-2 was an Indian lunar mission that was supposed to go where no country has ever gone before (the Moon’s South Polar Region).

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According to ISRO official credentials, “this mission will help us gain a better understanding of the origin and evolution of the Moon by conducting detailed topographical studies, comprehensive mineralogical analyses, and host of other experiments on the lunar surface. While there, we will also explore discoveries made by Chandrayaan-1, such as the presence of water molecules on the Moon and new rock types with unique chemical composition. Through this mission, we aim to: (1) expand India’s foot print in space; (2) inspire a future generation of scientists, engineers, and explorers; (3) surpass international aspirations”.

Launched on 22 July 2019 from Satish Dhawan Space Center on Sriharikota Island on an ISRO Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) Mark III. The lander-orbiter pair went into an initial elliptical, earth parking orbit, followed by a translunar injection on 14th August. The pair entered lunar polar orbit on 20th August. Subsequently, the lander and orbiter separated on the 2nd September.

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The orbiter evolved into a circular polar orbit and the Vikram lander maneuvered into orbit with a plan to land on the surface in the high latitude areas near the South Pole. On 7th September contact was lost during the descent at an altitude of approximately 2 KM.

The ISRO officials said that the spacecraft stopped communicating with Earth when it was within 1.3 miles of the lunar surface. Though contact with the Vikram lander was lost, the orbiter going around the moon and will carry out experiments over the next year.

On the eve of 7th September, several scientist, technologist and general public were eagerly waiting for the Vikram lander to land on the Moon’s South Polar Region. Even though, the communication between the orbiter and lander was lost, ISRO, Indian scientists and engineers received appreciation and support for their efforts around the globe.

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Gauhar Raza, an Indian scientist, Urdu poet and social activist said, “The objective of the Chandrayaan-2 will be solved by Chandrayaan-3. A lot of lessons has been learnt this time and we will definitely master the technology of the lander in the coming future”.

https://www.technologytimes.pk/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Chandrayaan-2-was-really-a-failure-but-for-whom-785x437.jpghttps://www.technologytimes.pk/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Chandrayaan-2-was-really-a-failure-but-for-whom-150x83.jpgGuest DeskArticlesTechnologyChandrayaan-2,failureBefore leaving Pakistan I had written a column “India’s Space Diplomacy in 2017: Where Pakistan Is Standing?” published in TechnologyTimes on July 19th, 2017. Author: Eng. Mirza Abdul Aleem Baig CAS-TWAS President's Fellow, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) In that column I highlighted the fundamental shift in how nations manage...Pakistan's Only Newspaper on Science and Technology
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